Tuesday, July 25, 2006

When surveillance meets bureaucracy

"Innocent People Placed On 'Watch List' To Meet Quota":
You could be on a secret government database or watch list for simply taking a picture on an airplane. Some federal air marshals say they're reporting your actions to meet a quota, even though some top officials deny it.

The air marshals, whose identities are being concealed, told 7NEWS that they're required to submit at least one report a month. If they don't, there's no raise, no bonus, no awards and no special assignments.

"Innocent passengers are being entered into an international intelligence database as suspicious persons, acting in a suspicious manner on an aircraft ... and they did nothing wrong," said one federal air marshal. ...

What kind of impact would it have for a flying individual to be named in an SDR?

"That could have serious impact ... They could be placed on a watch list. They could wind up on databases that identify them as potential terrorists or a threat to an aircraft. It could be very serious," said Don Strange, a former agent in charge of air marshals in Atlanta. He lost his job attempting to change policies inside the agency.
(via MetaFilter)

1 comment:

  1. After Aer Lingus cautioned me to put away my digital camera aboard a trans-Atlantic flight "for security reasons" I started to wonder if they were just winding me up. Maybe not.